Harness the power of the internet to sell your art and creativity online

Sell Your Art Online

7 Different Ways To Sell Your Art Online

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How to Have Yourself a Stellar Christmas This Year

With Christmas soon upon us, Martin Stellar shares ways that you can maximise your Christmas art sales, starting RIGHT NOW…

Remember I told you that people need you and your art?

I’ve good news for you: it comes with perks. Notably, we’re upon a time of the year when people REALLY need your art.

How do I know?

Because a work of art makes a fantastic Christmas present. Just you dare disagree.

Alright, I know: it’s only early October, why on earth am I on about the holiday season?

Very true.

But Here’s a Little Secret: Most Christmas Sales Happen in October and November

Now, I’ll be the first to understand if you don’t want to be part of the whole XMAS hoopla.

If you prefer to play it naturally and see what sales you’ll get, come December –that’s fine by me.

But do understand that you’ll be leaving a lot of money on the table.

And to put a little sting in it: There will be many people who would have loved to give a piece of your work as a present, but you decided not to make the effort to put it into their hands.

So, if you:

a) want to have more cash at the end of this year and

b) believe that – yes – your art does make a fantastic present…

 

Then put on your learning cap and let’s get rolling.

Fact: Britain Alone Will Spend 20 BILLION or More This Christmas Season

Yeah, let that sink in for a minute.

I’m not completely sure about the number, but this article shows us that in 2010, the total amount was £16.7 billion. I doubt it will be much less this year – if fact it’s likely to be much more.

Now it doesn’t matter what you make: if a pie is that big, you bet there’s a slice for you.

 

Fact: Over 30% of That is Spent in October and November

You want a slice of Christmas pie?

Then you’ll need to get to selling Christmas presents right this minute.

There is literally no time to waste.

But You Don’t Like the Christmas Hype

And you shouldn’t. Neither do I.

What I do like though, is solving people’s problems, and selling stuff they need is one way to do just that.

When you’re looking for a present, you have an itch to scratch.

Putting a great present in front of people and saying: “The recipient of this might like it a lot. It costs x” is a way to offer a scratch for that itch.

If they like it and they buy, you just solved a problem.

And then they pay you for it: ethical, non-pushy sales in a nutshell.

Now, of course you could argue that it’s only because of aggressive marketing techniques that people spend so much on presents.

But really, people like giving.

It’s something that comes naturally to us, for a number of reasons.

You could also argue that it’s because of the advertising industry, that if marketers would leave people alone, Christmas sales wouldn’t start until December.

I doubt that’s the case though.

I think it’s because in the end, Christmas is important to us.

The act of giving presents is for the most part based on an authentic desire to give.

No proof or research to back it up, just my opinion.

Either way: people worldwide are about to have a real need for presents.

And that’s not my opinion – it’s a fact.

Here’s How to Sell More Art This Autumn Than You Thought Possible – Without Feeling Seedy About it

Fact: Selling Art as a Present Comes Down to One Simple Thing

Placement.

That’s all there is to it.

Placement in this sense means nothing more than presenting your art as a possible present.

All you need to do is make people see your work as a gift.

You could just simply say it – invite people to consider your work as a present – that will already make a difference.

Seriously: If you’re in the habit of emailing your readers a picture of new work (a recommendable strategy, by the way), nobody is going to be upset if tomorrow you include a line such as: “I think this piece will actually make a great Christmas present. Just saying”.

See what I mean? You don’t need to force things on people – just make a suggestion to help them see your work as a gift.

Visually, you can do that by using design elements on your site: Christmas themed banners, figures and adornments are a great way to give a modest tinge of Christmas to your site.

Obviously, you’re not going to launch into a fullscale automatic email sequence replete with bells, whistles and reindeer, starting tomorrow.

We like to play our marketing nice.

You’re also not going to put snow and jingle bells all over your site. (Or music! – more about that further on).

Just start introducing small elements.

A few lines in your blog posts.

Or a blog post about art as a gift. You don’t even have to prominently mention Christmas.

Maybe send an extra email that says: “Hey, listen, soon I’ll be having a few items on special Christmas sale. Keep an eye on your inbox because that’s where I’ll notify you.”

A few small visual elements on your site, which you can add to as the holiday season gets closer.

Simple things, but they work.

One More Thing: NEVER Let Music Play Automatically On Your Site

I understand it’s fun, and that the right kind of music can enhance the atmosphere and the experience of your site.

Especially if you can use it to increase the Christmas theming of your site.

But letting music play automatically when the page loads is an extremely bad idea.

That is, if you want people to stay on your site.

It’s a fact, proven over and over again: Most people find it annoying, and many people will simply close the page.

That’s a pity, because you want people to actually stay around, look at your work, and buy something.

YouTube can use autoplay – sure. But YouTube is a video site, it’s an entirely different story.

I know how tempting it can be, but trust me on this one: Music on autoplay – Christmas or not – WILL cost you sales.

Alright, so let’s get ready to get more presents sold. Send me an email if you have questions or need help.

Good luck.

 

martin-stellar

Martin Stellar is technically a copywriter and marketing consultant, but really he’s one of those people who can’t help trying to motivate and inspire people, given half a chance. He blogs at www.martinstellar.com, where much motivating and inspiring takes place, and he’s usually good fun on twitter.

Image courtesy of Amy_b

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Selling Your Art Is Your Duty! – A Passionate Plea From The Heart…

A few weeks back I received an intriguing email from Martin Stellar. He had a particular {and traumatic} life experience to draw on which had taught him a very important lesson about art marketing. I will leave him to share this vitally important lesson with you in this guest post. Thanks Martin…

If you signed up to Helen’s ebook series (which you totally should), you’ll have read about the elephant in the room: That strange aversion to selling that so many artisans and creatives live with.

I agree with Helen’s teaching: She says that we needn’t feel anything negative when it comes to selling or marketing our art, but I want to make an even stronger point:

As an artist, it’s not enough to just accept sales, selling and marketing as a necessary part of the artist’s life.

You need to understand that selling your art is your moral and ethical duty.

Yep, I really said that.

And I have a good reason for it too:

As an artist, you owe it to the world to get mighty comfortable with marketing and selling, and to get at least moderately good at it.

Because you make a difference. You make the world a more beautiful place.

Your work, your daily toil and your innermost creativity: all of that conspires to bring more beauty to the world, one print; one canvass or one photo at a time.

If you’re an artist, you believe in the art you create (no matter how deep down that may be, hidden by a public mask of insecurity).

If you didn’t believe in your art, you wouldn’t live how you live and make what you make.

And if you believe in your art, you owe it to the world to sell as much of it as you possibly can.

Sidenote: My editor tells me I should talk about sharing your art, instead of selling – she makes a good point, but I believe selling is the single best way to share your art.

Anyway: If your art can improve a house, a room, a face or a street… bring something beautiful or meaningful into the world… Then OF COURSE you should sell it. Tons of it, if you can.

All this is of course a generously grandiloquent way to look at things.

After all, we don’t all create deeply inspired one-off pieces

I can understand that if your business is, say, selling printed t-shirts of your own design, you might not feel that you contribute as much as someone who creates unique life-size sculptures.

But think again.

Your t-shirts also add to the total.

People buy them because it gives them pleasure, they enjoy owning and wearing them, they like to be seen wearing them and so on.

I’d say that with each t-shirt sold, you just added a bit of happiness or enjoyment to someone’s life. Right? Right.

It really makes no difference what you make, how many, how big they are, how much they cost.

If you consider yourself an artist that inherently means that you make things that are meant to enhance the world

Now tell me, don’t you think this not only justifies and necessitates, but even obliges you as an artist to find as many people as you can who will buy what you make?

Should it not be your mission to make people’s lives a bit better with your art, as often as you can?

I’d say so.

It’s your duty to sell (read: share) your art.

You make the world better, more meaningful and more beautiful. Each time you create, you do the world a favour.

Each time you sell, doubly so.

What do I know?

Now, you might wonder where I get the nerve to come at you with all this high-faluting pomp and circumstance.

After all, I’m not even an artist myself. I couldn’t draw a stick-figure to save my life.

No, my genetic makeup is similar, but not quite the same: I’m what’s known as an artisan.

Specifically, I’m a bespoke tailor. Or used to be, before I became a marketing writer.

It’s a long story, but the short of it is that I used to have my own tailoring company, in which I myself created high end bespoke suits, fully handmade.

For a while I ran a blog and I ranked nicely on Google, just below Savile Row tailors, and I was getting a decent reputation on several forums.

Prices were also up there with Savile Row, and I was getting some sales.

At some point my father passed away, and I ended up with a sizeable inheritance that I decided to invest in my business.

Things looked like I was set for success.

But all that money, (all 120,000 pounds of it. Ouch.), I lost over the course of five years.

Here’s why my tailoring business tanked, forcing me to change careers:

I refused to really come to terms with the (very high) intrinsic value of what I created with my own two hands

Until the end, when I ran that company into the ground, I always approached the marketing and sales of it all as if it were a necessary evil.

And the only reason for that, I realise now, is that I didn’t value my stuff the way I should have.

The way you should value your stuff. Which I’m guessing you might not really do, just like me, back then.

And you may take all this as literally as you like (hint: the more literally you take it, the more your sales will soar).

You see, aside from the fact that creating a suit is in itself creating a piece of art (provided you do it by hand like bespoke tailors ought to), there is the value to the customer, and in that sense art and artisanry are very similar.

In both situations, the value to the customer sort of has no limits

You would be amazed by what people are willing to pay. Trust me, I’m a marketer (these days), and I know exactly how much the right people are willing to pay for art.

Or for my suits for that matter. Because that was the amazing thing I discovered: You can charge literally anything you want, and you’ll have people buying it.

It gets even better: the higher your prices, the more eager people will be to buy

That’s something I hope Helen will allow me to explain at a later point. Provided of course that she’d like to have me tell more of the story of how a young tailor had a chance and blew it.

For now, I just really want to hope that you see my point, because you so much deserve to live with the confident (and slighty bold) attitude I’ve been describing.

What you do makes a difference. Make it happen more, make a bigger difference.

Even if it’s one printed mug at a time.

You’re an artist
It’s your nature to create beauty
You’re an artist
It’s your duty to sell the beauty you create

Martin Stellar is technically a copywriter and marketing consultant, but really he’s one of those people who can’t help trying to motivate and inspire people, given half a chance. He blogs at www.martinstellar.com, where much motivating and inspiring takes place, and he’s usually good fun on twitter.

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Selling Art Online with Instagram {5 top tips + more}

Over the last few months you have probably noticed more and more images being shared across Facebook and other social networks. These photos often have an arty quality to them and retro style image frames around them. These images are originating from the smartphone app Instagram.

Instagram is an app that you use on your iPhone, iPad or Android based device. It allows you to shoot a photo and then process it in app to add a variety of filters and frames. However, the magic is then that Instagram allows you to share that photo across a variety of social media sites with one click of the button.

Like all social media sites or apps, Instagram has it’s fair share of brain sucking rubbish to wade through. This is mostly comprised of young girls taking photos of their hair and what they are eating [usually cupcakes].  However, used carefully and intelligently, the visual nature of Instagram is brilliant for artists. Its a great way of showing your work to the world and finding new fans for what you do.

One of the great things about Instagram is that it allows you to publish your images to other social media sites too therefore making your life easier in one fell swoop. Whenever you post an image you can also share it with Tumblr, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and via Email. One good picture of your work can go a long way with very little effort {always good where time sucking social media is concerned}

So how can Instagram help you grow your work, brand and visibility as an artist? Where do you start? I have put together a 5 tips below to help you get to grips with ways to use Instagram to help you sell art online…

 

1 What images should I post on Instagram?

Use Instagram to introduce people to your work. Therefore show them what you do, photographing your work and process, tools you use, places you visit, inspiration and things you like. Aim to use the app to give people a little glimpse into your art, ideas and life as an artist.

2 Keep it local

I have found the best success by using Instagram to find potential local fans and customers. By using this method I have developed a new relationship with a lovely local art gallery and found several new local customers for my work with very little effort.

My method is to search within the app for the hashtag of my local town {ie #London, #NewYork or wherever you live} Then comment on images by local people and start up a conversation. In this way I have grown my followers and made some great local connections who now see my work every time they check Instagram. If I were to hold an exhibition or local event I could easily use Instagram to help with publicity towards it. I intend to do this in the future.

It’s also a great idea to search for and follow local artists too to bring you local connections and networking opportunities that can help grow your work.

3 The secret is in the hashtags.

Post a picture alone onto Instagram and chances are you wont get much attention. However, the secret is to tag your picture correctly with the right hashtags. That way, people searching for the subject of your image can find your work.

So, for example, if you paint watercolour landscapes of New England you may want to use the hashtags #landscapepainting #NewEngland #watercolour #art #drawing or similar. A little bit of research using the hashtag search facility in the app will help you know which hashtags to use. Hashtags are definitely the key when it comes to using Instagram well and you can add many different ones to each image.

4 Can I sell my art directly through Instagram?

Instagram does not have a way to allow you to sell art directly through the app. I see it more as a way of creating or finding an audience for your work and spreading the word about what you do, leading people back to your main site or shop. However, I have seen popular artists with many followers release images of work for sale on Instagram along with a direct paypal address for payment and sell out their editions so it can definitely be done.

5 Can I use Instagram to promote my shop or sale?

Once you have an audience on Instagram you can promote items on your website or shop site. You can’t create a direct link in Instagram but I have seen people use an image very successfully to flag up sales and promotions on their site or Etsy shop. Simply prepare a nice image with the relevant information and then post to Instagram.

You can use apps like PhotoCollage, InstaCollage, PicFrame and InstaEffects or similar to create a nice promotional image for your sale.

 

But don’t Instagram want to steal all my images?

Instagram has recently come in for a lot of criticism for rewriting its terms and conditions in a way which gave them far too much legal access to users images, being able to use them for advertising. Users left in droves and the repercussions echoed around the social media sphere. Instagram was forced to look again into it’s policies and back down somewhat.

However, as with all Social Media sites it’s well to treat it with some caution as you never know what direction they will take in the future. Don’t post any clear images of work you want to fully control. Teaser images only.

 

Instagram Do’s and Dont’s

DO

  • Watermark your image – PhotoMarkr is just one app which can do this. Watermark with your website address so that wherever your image ends up people can find out who you are.
  • Follow artists you love. Then any time you log on to Instagram you have a ready stream of inspiration to look at.
  • Make every image count – don’t just post photos of cups of coffee and your new hairstyle. Post only one or two really great images a day. Quality over quantity definitely works on Instagram.
  • Link Instagram to your Flickr, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr accounts and use it to feed them with content. You don’t even need to spend any time on them. It’s a good way to get your work seen.
  • As always, try and lead people back to your main website with an offer or other enticement. Try and get them to sign up to your mailing list.

DON’T

  • Post easily steal-able nice straight on usable images of your work. Instagram images seem particularly prone to being ripped off by unscrupulous copyright ignoring trolls. Therefore, use Instagram images as a “tease” to interest people in your work. Post photos of your work shot at a strange angle, a small part of the whole image, or blur out some of the image {you can do this in the Instagram app} The idea is to lead people back to your main content elsewhere and raise your profile.
  • Release any image that you want to keep control over. Instagram images have a life of their own. Once you have set them free you have to just let them go.

 

So give Instagram a go. Its fun, inspirational [if you follow the right people] and doesn’t take up much time. Post your instagram profile address below so we can all look at your photos. Happy snapping.

 

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The Best Website to Sell Art Online – The Truth

There is one question that I get asked on a regular, pretty much daily basis by artists venturing into the world of selling art online. I get asked so regularly that I thought a post addressing the issue would be a good idea.

The question is “What are the best websites to sell art?”

And the answer? It’s surprisingly simple. The answer is “your own website”

The best website to sell art online is…  your own!

Sadly there are no magic websites that will do all the work for you. That you can just upload your images to and then forget about and wait for the money to roll in. Wherever you put your work for sale you will need to promote it to get visitors to view and buy it.

And why put your time and energy into promoting someone elses site? Why not spend it on promoting your own website and domain name?

Etsy, Facebook, Zazzle, Redbubble etc all offer a brilliant service but it’s best not to rely on them exclusively for your online sales.  What if they collapse, close or change their terms of service in  way you don’t like and you want to move? What happens to all the hours you have spent getting links and promotion to your shopfront? All gone in the click of a mouse…

Rent your property or own your own home?

If you own your own domain name and website you are in control.

You can then point visitors from there to your Etsy or Redbubble shop if you want but all your promotional efforts take visitors to YOUR domain name and website first, so you can easily swap shop providers should you wish to without losing all your visitors.

I love the metaphor that it’s like the difference between renting or buying a house. You dont want to spend loads of energy and money fitting a swanky new kitchen in your rented pad only to be turfed out by the landlord next month, but any improvements made to your bought house are an investment for the future.

Still not convinced? Here are some more good reasons why your own website is the best plan for selling art online.

7 good reasons for setting up your own website

You will look more professional

You can control the way the site looks rather than being reliant on a parent shop sites generic style.

You can create your own brand

The design of your website can fit in with the style and branding of your work – again making you look more professional and giving your work a coherent showcase

You can control your own domain name

Registering and using your own domain name {ie www.yourname.com} looks great, helps with search engine results and allows you to have a proper associated email address too. No more shoddy looking hotmail addresses. And your domain name is yours to keep, so you always get the traffic directed there.

You can stand out in the crowd

Its very easy to get lost in amongst the bazillions of users on the large selling sites. You own website allows you to be able to stand out in the crowd and be easily found by search engines.

You won’t have to pay commission

Anything you sell on your own site is commission free. Hooray. [Although you may have to pay a small transaction fee to Paypal].

You have freedom

You can stop or change to another selling site easily with no problems. You won’t lose your client list or the advantage of all the promotion you have done as it will all still point to your personal website. Just change the links to your new shopfront and away you go!

Endless possibilities…

There are no constraints on what you do with your own site. You can make it your own little corner of the web. Every bit of promotion is an investment for the future. You can build your own domain and art career step by step…

if you are serious about selling artwork online or setting up a creative business then the best website to sell your art is most definitely your own… Setting it up is a crucial step that will pay dividends in the long run.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Road To Success – Are You On It?

A little while back I wrote about the difficulty of learning a new skill and how you would have to navigate what Seth Godin calls “The Dip”. The bit of your journey where the initial optimism and excitement of what you are trying to learn wears off and you are faced with the steep and harsh climb up the cliff face of learning towards mastery. This is the bit thats unforgiving and just not that much fun. You have to dig deep and pull through it to get to the other side.

At the moment I am struggling to learn THE most difficult art related skill I have ever faced. Therefore I wanted to share with you the following WONDERFUL image which beautifully illustrates the struggle we all face when trying to learn new skills or improve our current ones.

I don’t know the artist of this image or when it dates from. I found it on the wall of a tattooists in Louisiana. Thats all I know, but a picture speaks a thousand words.

If you are struggling with your own journey, take a look and share it. Hopefully it will help you find your own path…

 Please click the blurry image below to see it in all it’s full size glory…

The Road To Success Selling Art Online

The Road To Success

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The Results – The Enterprising Artists Survey

A little while back, myself and Dan from www.rightbrainrockstar.com asked artists to take part in an online survey to enable us all to get a better idea of the lie of the land when it comes to using the internet to sell or promote art.

Well, after some mammoth number crunching from Dan the results are now in. {Apologies for the length of time it has taken to compile the results. We were going to be happy with 50 replies and we actually got an amazing 954 artists completing the survey meaning that it took longer than anticipated to deal with the resulting fascinating data.}




First Things First

Firstly – a big thanks to everyone that took the time to fill in the survey. It is really appreciated. We hope you find the results interesting and helpful. You can find a list of people who took part and their websites at the end of this article {big thanks to Dan for compiling this list}

The Questions of Gender Balance

One of the most fascinating results of the survey is that the vast majority of people who replied are women. The respondents were 83% Female and 17% Male.

Women are obviously getting out there and taking control of their own art career by the use of the internet which is heartening news. However, this throws open other questions as to why men are so under represented. Do they not enjoy fulling out surveys? Is the internet a channel suited to women but not so much to men? Where do male artists sell their work? As with many things, answers lead to more questions.

 

The Internet – Don’t be distracted by the butterflies…

The internet is extremely important to artists participating in the survey. 82% of artists use it up to 20 hours per week for promoting/marketing, networking, research, promotion or selling. The majority of time online was spent using Social Media to sell or promote art {up to 80%}.

Whilst it was good to see that nearly as much time was spent on artists own websites, much less time {less than 50%} was spent on working with email or newsletters. This is somewhat worrying as social media is often the opening point to finding new fans/clients/collectors but a newsletter or email is often where you close the deal and make sales.

It is slightly worrying that by focusing on the distracting butterfly that is social media, artists are missing a trick in growing and maintaining their mailing list, the really important bit where the sales can be made.

In 2011, over half of the respondents generated less than 10% of personal income from art. More focus on other parts of the internet puzzle including mailing lists could help this to grow. 40% of artists websites were out of date or irrelevant, a part of the puzzle that is fairly easily fixed. Woman cannot live on Facebook alone 😉

If you are at all unsure about the importance of starting and growing a mailing list, read this post “What is your crucial secret weapon for selling art? : Lessons from “The Apprentice”

Your mailing list, in conjunction with your website, is probably the single most important piece of the jigsaw of your internet strategy for selling art.

Marketing is the biggest challenge for artists.

63.52% of respondents stated that promotion and marketing were the biggest challenge to earning income as an artist. It was heartening to see that only 20.44% were having a challenge with artistic skill and direction although insecurity, doubt and lack of direction were a big issue at 48.22%

We know what we are doing artistically but need a little help and confidence to market our work to the world.

Overview

All in all the survey results were extremely positive. It was great to see so many people get involved and be so enthusiastic about sharing their experiences. The fact that so many women are online, getting their work out into the world is wonderful.

The challenges faced by artists in marketing and selling their work are all solvable with the help of all the great blogs named in the survey. Artists marketing and selling their work online are at the forefront of a new way of selling and are rising to the challenge.

Download the full report

These are just a few of the highlights of the report. You can view and download the full report here from www.rightbrainrockstar.com

Dan has summarised the results over on www.rightbrainrockstar.com. Cory Huff of the Abundant Artist has written an interesting post on the survey results and offers some suggestions.

And big thanks goes to…

The following artists completed the survey. Here are links to their websites. Please take 5 minutes to check out what they are doing… {Big thanks to Dan for compiling this extensive list}

Alicia Adanna (Visit website@ZuriART

Rosemarie Adcock (Visit website@rosemarieadcock
Cigdem Aksoy
Robyn Alatorre (Visit website)
John Alden (Visit website@japhotoguy
Jo Allebach (Visit website)
Alex Alvis (Visit website)
Tracy Anderson (Visit website)
Linda Anderson (Visit website)
Keith Andrews (Visit website)
Garland Arnaud
Noble Artist (Visit website)
April Ashby (Visit website) @stellatadesign
Lesley Atlansky (Visit website@latlansky
Sarah Atlee (Visit website)
Anna Ayres (Visit website)
Alicia Bailey (Visit website@abecedarianbook
patricia baldwin seggebruch (Visit website@pbsartist
Nancy Barry (Visit website)
Sandy Bartholomew (Visit website@SandyBee
stephanie bartz (Visit website@HeyBartzie
Catherine Bath (Visit website@cathyfatimah
Andy Bauer (Visit website@ArtByAndy
Mickey Baxter-Spade (Visit website@MickeysArt
Sarah Bays (Visit website@Thumb_print_ink
Lisa Sonora Beam (Visit website) @LisaSonoraBeam
Robert Bean (Visit website@rbfineart
Ann Bean
Elias Beniflah (Visit website)
Laurie Bennett (Visit website) @sewmanydiapers
Teresa Beyer (Visit website)
Penney Bidwell (Visit website)
Helen Billett (Visit website@MeringueInc
Robert Alan Black (Visit website@Cre8ngAlan
Brad Blackman (Visit website@bradblackman
Anne Catharine Blake (Visit website@ACatharineBlake
Chris blevins (Visit website)
Sam L Boehner (Visit website@samboehnerart
Mic Boekelmann (Visit website@micbstudio
Tina Bohlman (Visit website@tinabohlman
laura bolle (Visit website) @lbolle_artist
Deniece Bonner (Visit website) @ClarityArt
Lori Boocks (Visit website@LoriAnneBoocks
Chris Book
Jill Booth (Visit website@Austropicalart
Jason Bordash (Visit website)
Jana Botkin (Visit website)
Clare Bowditch (Visit website@clarebowditch
Sara Bowen (Visit website@rhubarbella
Fi Bowman (Visit website@fibowman
Mary Lea Bradley (Visit website@mlbradleyartist
Dennis Brady (Visit website@Dennisbrady
Christine Brallier (Visit website@cbmosaics
Yvonne Branchflower (Visit website)
Erika Brandner (Visit website@Ekabo
Allison Bratt (Visit website@AllisonBrattArt
claire Brewster (Visit website@clairebrewster
Travis Brimner (Visit website)
Val Britton (Visit website)
Siobhan Brocklehurst (Visit website@GemstoneOrchid
Carla Brooks (Visit website@DeltaMoonSoap
Zachary Brown (Visit website@ZacharyBrown
kyle bryant (Visit website@thekbco
Jacqueline Bryant Campbell (Visit website@Jbryantcampbell
Brenna Busse (Visit website)
Libby Bussinah (Visit website) @Libbys09
Pattie Byron (Visit website@pattiebyron
KC Cali (Visit website) @kccaliartist
Nana Campana (Visit website@nanacampana
Elissa Campbell (Visit website@blueroofdesigns
Jean Cannon (Visit website)
Patricia Capracotta (Visit website) @AGreenGoddess
Patricia Carberry (Visit website)
Gwen Card (Visit website) @FrontPorchArt
Ruth Cardin (Visit website)
Mii Careta
Carole Carlson (Visit website)
KB Carpenter (Visit website)
Kathleen Carrier (Visit website@katcarrier 
Mike Carvin (Visit website) @craftyguy
Joseph Cavalieri (Visit website)
Julie Chapman (Visit website)
Lindsay Cheesewright (Visit website) @FaerieMajikk
jamie chiarello (Visit website)
Elisa Choi (Visit website@harmonythoughts
Roula Chreim (Visit website@roulachreim
Carolyn Christensen (Visit website)
Joelle Circé (Visit website@CirceArt
Lucy Clark (Visit website)
Corey Clark (Visit website) @clclark22
Violette Clark (Visit website@violetteclark
MaryAnn Cleary (Visit website@maryanncleary
Heather Clements (Visit website@artheatherart
sam clift (Visit website@sam_clift
raquel coelho
Annette Coleman (Visit website@AnnetteColeman
Donyae Coles (Visit website@okokno
Dean Collings (Visit website) @ProfsrD
dawn collins (Visit website@ZetasAttic
Guy Combes (Visit website)
Ellyn Cooper
Sarah Cooper (Visit website@keepsakescrafts
Amber Coppings (Visit website@Xmittens
Kathy Cousart (Visit website@kathycousart
Amy Cox (Visit website) @none
Rebecca Croft (Visit website)
Amy Crook (Visit website@amysnotdeadyet
Terry Cullen (Visit website)
Michael Cullen (Visit website@cullenpix
Heather Dakota (Visit website)
Liz Danforth (Visit website@lizdanforth
Anne Davenport (Visit website@AnneNilesDav
Lezley Davidson (Visit website@lezleydavidson
Karen Davis (Visit website@ChitlinCircuit
Ellene Breedlove Davis (Visit website) @ElleneBDavis
Kelley Dawkins (Visit website)
Jose De la Barra (Visit website)
Christine DeCamp (Visit website)
clara dees (Visit website)
Renee Delight-La Torre (Visit website@rldelight
Miranda Delphia (Visit website@panduhmonium
Nancy Denmark (Visit website@NDenmarkArt
Judy DeRosa (Visit website)
Kathleen Dickson (Visit website)
Vonnie Diehl @tuomala
Mari Dieumegard (Visit website)
Melissa Dinwiddie (Visit website@a_creative_life
Ann Domingue (Visit website@atdomingue
louise Douglas (Visit website@louisedouglas56
Crescent Dragonwagon (Visit website@cdragonwagon
Jason Drake (Visit website@jdrake55
Annie Draper (Visit website)
chris dreux (Visit website)
Donna Iona Drozda (Visit website@ionadrozda
Nan Drye (Visit website)
Donna Duncan (Visit website) @metamorphisarts
Sam Dunford (Visit website) @samdunford_art
Paolo Durandetto (Visit website@durandetto
Kieren Dutcher (Visit website)
Jo-Ann Dziubek-MacDonald (Visit website@jdmstudios
Kit Eastman (Visit website)
Kristen Eaton (Visit website@vaguelybohemian
Diane Edwards (Visit website)
Sidney Eileen (Visit website)
Susan Elliot (Visit website)
Heidi Emmett
Beverly Endsley (Visit website@bevendsley
Nanci Erskine (Visit website@erskinestudio
Amy Evans (Visit website@amyevansart
Kristen Fagan (Visit website@CreativeStash
Brittany Faulkner (Visit website) @with britt
Kathleen Faulkner (Visit website)
Michele Fawcett (Visit website@MFischerWriter
Jennifer Fay (Visit website@jlfay
michelle fellegy (Visit website)
Gina Femrite (Visit website@no
Marilyn Fenn (Visit website@MarilynFenn
Cindy Ferreira (Visit website)
Dora Ficher (Visit website@doraficher
Karen Fields (Visit website) @kfieldsdesign
Patricia J Finley (Visit website) @PatriciaFinleyArtist
Laura Fisher (Visit website) @baisebeige
Tracey Fletcher King (Visit website)
Anna Foley (Visit website@ABFoleyArtworks
Felicia Follum (Visit website@FeliciaFollum
Julia Forsyth (Visit website@JuliaForsythArt
Cindy Fort (Visit website@cindyjfort
Marian Fortunati (Visit website)
Stuart Fowle (Visit website@artonthehoof
Gwen Fox (Visit website)
Susan Fox (Visit website@s_fox
Suzette Fram (Visit website)
Suzanne Frazier (Visit website@ContempArt
Christine Fredendall (Visit website)
Karen Fridy (Visit website@Threadchick
Dianna Fritzler (Visit website)
Anna Fuchs (Visit website@AnnaFuchsBcn
KS Funderburg
Shannon Ganshorn (Visit website@shannonganshorn
Jackie Garner (Visit website@garnerart
Madelyn Garrett (Visit website)
marc garrison (Visit website)
Jo-Anne Gazo-McKim (Visit website@jgazomckim
Bill Gehring (Visit website)
Ronald Gillis (Visit website@rcg46
kellyann gilson lyman (Visit website@kellyannart
Annie Glacken (Visit website)
Janet Glatz (Visit website@janetglatz
Sonelle Goddard (Visit website@SonelleG
Marie K Godwin (Visit website@artistmkgodwin
Tahirih Goffic (Visit website@paintingmommy37
Monica Gonzalez (Visit website)
Hilde Goossens (Visit website@HildeGoossens78
connie gorsline
Olga Gouskova (Visit website)
Patrick Gracewood (Visit website)
Pat Grady (Visit website@embellishbliss
Crista Grasso (Visit website@ambertortoise
Sharon Graves (Visit website)

Victoria Gray (Visit website)

Deborah Grayson (Visit website@GraysonStudio
Joann Greenbaum (Visit website)
norma greenwood (Visit website@normadventures
Sean Griffin (Visit website@lightscapesfoto
Lina Grigaitis (Visit website)
Elizabeth Groeschen (Visit website@elizadele
Sari Grove (Visit website@GroveCanada
Beth Grove (Visit website)
Julie Gubler (Visit website) @heroprnt
Adriana Guidi (Visit website)
Erin Gursslin (Visit website@ssilverwear
Laura Habel (Visit website@heartinhawaii
Charlotte Hagan, RN
Johanus Haidner (Visit website) @JohanusHaidner
J. Haley (Visit website@jhaleyarts
terrie hall (Visit website)
Dee Hall (Visit website) @hatup
Mckenna Hallett (Visit website)
Elizabeth Halpern (Visit website)
Kariyappa Hanchinamani (Visit website)
alison hankinson
Amelia Hansen (Visit website)
kathryn hansen (Visit website)
Rosemarie Hanus (Visit website@spawnofflame
Alice Harpel (Visit website) @aliceharpel
Martha Harrell (Visit website)
Tiffany Harris (Visit website)
Teresa Harrison (Visit website) @treeartlady
Sandi Harrold (Visit website)
Jill Hartley (Visit website)
Kathleen Harvey (Visit website@doulakat
Linda Hatfield (Visit website)
Jacqui Hawk (Visit website@jacquihawkart
David Haynes (Visit website)
Judith HeartSong (Visit website@judithheartsong
Sarah Hempel Irani (Visit website@SarahHIrani
K Henderson (Visit website)
Kate Henke (Visit website@katenke
Jock and Carmen Hildebrand (Visit website)
Deborah Hill (Visit website)
Kaylee Hinrichs (Visit website@kayleehinrichs
Libby Hintz (Visit website@libbyhintzart
ken hobson (Visit website@none
Brandon Hodgkin (Visit website)
Jackie Hoeksema (Visit website)
Vanessa Hofmann V2 (Visit website) @vvanbeusekom
Sarah Hollandsworth (Visit website@yarngeekfibers
Terry Hope (Visit website)
Carol Houghton-Tenney (Visit website)
cory huff (Visit website@agoodhusband
Aimee Hughes (Visit website) @BellaCraft
Pamela Hunt Lee (Visit website@pamela hunt lee
Floyd IAm @Floyd IAm
Lazaro Iglesias (Visit website)
Beverly Ingle (Visit website) @beverlyingle
gary irish (Visit website)
Raj Iyer (Visit website@IamRajIyer
Dolores Jablonski (Visit website) @atawhim
charlene jacka (Visit website@505clayspace
JJ Jacobs (Visit website@abstractsbyjj
Sethi Jacobson (Visit website)
James Jarvis (Visit website) @JJarvisartist
Tamara Leigh Jarvis
Leah Jay (Visit website@leahjayart
dale jenssen (Visit website)
Barry Johansen (Visit website) @barryjohnsen
Marty Johnson (Visit website@bzbwoman
Lonna Johnson (Visit website)
Sarita Li Johnson (Visit website@SaritaLiJohnson
JoAnn Jordan (Visit website@JordanEM
Becky Joy (Visit website@beckyjoyartist
April Joy (Visit website)
Melanie K (Visit website@MelanieK__
Jamie Kalvestran (Visit website@JamieKalvestran
Kelly Kautz (Visit website@KellyKauz
jonathan keeton (Visit website)
Leslie Kell (Visit website)
Toni Kelly (Visit website@A_Spattering
Barbara Kemp Cowlin (Visit website)
Donalee Kennedy (Visit website) @DonaleeKennedy
Robin Kent (Visit website)
M Sanzi Kermes (Visit website@sanzistudio
Rachel Kerwin (Visit website)
Christopher King (Visit website@wingsart
Tim King (Visit website)
Carolyn King (Visit website)
Jen Kirby (Visit website) @jenkirby
Donna Kitchens (Visit website)
Duygu Kivanc (Visit website)
Colleayn Klaibourne (Visit website)
Helen Klebesadel (Visit website@HelenKlebesadel
Laurie Klein (Visit website) @ljkphoto
Lloyd Knowles (Visit website)
Alexa Kocinski @alexakocinski
Shana Kohnstamm @shanakohnstamm
Joe Kopler (Visit website)
Christi Kraft (Visit website@CKPFineArt
Ria Krishnan (Visit website@RiaKrishnanArt
charlotte kruk (Visit website)
Candy Kuehn (Visit website) @candykuehn
Marina Kulik (Visit website@aquarellista
Helena Kuttner-Giasson (Visit website)
Jane LaFazio (Visit website@JaneLaFazio
Joshua Lance (Visit website@joshualanceart
Jamie Lapeyrolerie (Visit website) @jamielynne82
Alice Larsen (Visit website@art from alice
Marc Lawrence (Visit website@MarcLawrenceArt
Larry Le Brane (Visit website)
Robert Lee (Visit website@BruthaRob
Stacy Leeman (Visit website@stacy leeman
Susan Jane Lees (Visit website)
Shelly Leit (Visit website@shellinayaart
Teresa Levite (Visit website@mrslevite
Fay Liberty (Visit website)
Terri LLoyd (Visit website@clvngodess
Linda Loder
Vince LoGreco (Visit website@CaptainV45
Jeanne Lorenz (Visit website)
Dorothy Lorenze (Visit website@Dblorenzeartist
Beth Lowell (Visit website) @blowell
jen lowery (Visit website)
Amy Lund (Visit website@aclhandweaver
Eoin Mac Lochlainn (Visit website@EMacLochlainn
Carol MacConnell (Visit website)
Kate MacGillivary (Visit website)
kim mackey (Visit website)
Robert Maddison (Visit website)
Kathleen Mahoney (Visit website) @khmahoneyart
Robert Malcom (Visit website)
Tina Mammoser (Visit website@tina_m
Lori Mani (Visit website)
Sandhya Manne (Visit website@sandhyamanne
Megan Manske (Visit website@dwnrabbithole80
Athena Mantle (Visit website@AthenaMantle
Mandar Marathe (Visit website)
Angeline Marie (Visit website)
Jennifer Marlow (Visit website@JMWoodcarver
Tina Marohn (Visit website)
Lorna Marrison (Visit website)
Christine Marsh (Visit website@ChristineMarsh
Christine Martell (Visit website@cmartell
Meridith Martens (Visit website) @Meridithm
Sue Martin (Visit website)
Emily Martin (Visit website)
Christine Marx (Visit website)
Tobi Mattingly (Visit website@tobimattingly
Marcus McAllister (Visit website)
Susan McCormick (Visit website)
Robin McCoy (Visit website)
Donna McGee (Visit website@donnamcgee
Cathy McIntire (Visit website)
Tim McKay
Dena McKitrick (Visit website@ArtistJoyful
Bob McLean
debi mcmanus-plett
Garry McMichael (Visit website)
lori mcnee (Visit website@lorimcneeartist
Todd McPhetridge (Visit website@toddmcphetridge
Anna Measures (Visit website@annameasures
Kelly Medford (Visit website@KellyMedfordArt
Patricia Mendoza (Visit website@epicofthe3stars
Rose Marie Mercado (Visit website)
Mary Merrill (Visit website@vivyscloset
Gwyn Michael (Visit website@gwynmichael
Cindy Michaud (Visit website)
Janet Miller (Visit website) @Kyoti13
Burt Miller
Gabriella Mirollo (Visit website)
Gary Mishko
shirley monestier (Visit website)
Debbie Moore @Whispoo
Cindy Morefield (Visit website) @CindyMorefield
Sara Morison (Visit website) @Saramorison
Naomi Morris Landers
Ahavani Mullen (Visit website)
RaeLyn Murphy (Visit website) @RaeLynMurphy
Leah Murray (Visit website@Old_Crone
Jacky Murtaugh (Visit website) @jackymurtaugh
liza myers (Visit website@lizamyers
Cittie Myers (Visit website)
Carrie Myers-Hendrix (Visit website)
nadia nadege (Visit website@nadianadege
Jean Necheles (Visit website@JNecheles
Jason Nelson (Visit website@StoneSculptorJN
Nancy Ness (Visit website)
Dean Ng (Visit website@DeanNg
Naomi Nicholls (Visit website)
Nioshii (Visit website@Nartist
Diane Nunez (Visit website)
Anne Nye (Visit website@glassartist1
Paula Ogier (Visit website@PaulaOgierArt
Sharron Okines (Visit website)
Mejo Okon (Visit website)
Tom Oliver (Visit website@Tomoliverart
Adam Oriti (Visit website)
Michael Owens (Visit website)
Terry Parker (Visit website@lomapriepottery
Pat Payne @UnauthorizUsage
Robin Pedrero (Visit website@robinpedrero
Sandrine pelissier (Visit website@PelissierS
Victoria Pendragon (Visit website)
ricardo perez jr (Visit website) @infinitestand
JoAnne Perez Robinson (Visit website)
Cathryn Peters (Visit website@wickerwoman
LeeAnn Petropoulos (Visit website@lapetropoulos
Cyndi Pfeiffer (Visit website)
Mark Polege (Visit website)
Elissa Poma (Visit website@elissapoma
Marianne Post (Visit website@mariannepost
Jo Prinsloo (Visit website)
Diana Probst (Visit website@dianaprobst
Jack Providenti (Visit website)
Tanner Pruess
candace pryor @artacrobat
Andrew Purchin (Visit website@andrewpurchin
Fiona Purdy (Visit website)
Marika Purisima (Visit website@meeks_p
Alison Quine (Visit website) @alisonquine
deb raguso (Visit website) @artistnurse
Heidi Rand (Visit website@GardenDelight
Luna Raven (Visit website) @acuriousgirl13
Joanna Read Cotter (Visit website@joyinmystudio
Phili Rees (Visit website) @digitalcloudart
Mark Reeves (Visit website@sqinchesoflove
Amy Reges (Visit website) @LabradorArt
Luis Remesar (Visit website)
Kerry Remp (Visit website) @Folding4U
Jenn Ressmann (Visit website@jennressmann
Stephanie Revennaugh (Visit website)
Katarinaa Rheeder (Visit website)
Noella Richard @NoellaArt
Deborah Richardson (Visit website)
Craig Robb (Visit website)
Susan Roberts
Jane Robinson (Visit website@artepicurean
Michele Rollen-Hanson (Visit website)
Jennie Rosenbaum (Visit website@Minxdragon
Val Rosile (Visit website) @aspireandgrow
Mechelle roskiewicz (Visit website@loveddogsart
Lucia Rothgeb (Visit website)
Lelija Roy (Visit website@lelija
Liz Ruse (Visit website)
David Russell (Visit website@vtphoto53
Stuart Russell (Visit website) @StuieArtwork
Imke Rust (Visit website@imkerust
Julie Rustad (Visit website@julieoriginals
Conn Ryder (Visit website)
Hillel Rzepka (Visit website@handmadehearts
Rosalind San Felipe (Visit website)
Jo-Ann Sanborn (Visit website@jsanborn
Isabel Sanchez (Visit website@bethychiara
Kimberly Santini (Visit website@ksantini
Jane Santorumn
Marsha Savage (Visit website)
Megan Sax (Visit website) @MSaxxy
Judy Schafers (Visit website)
Gayle Schmidt (Visit website)
Kaere Schmidt (Visit website) @whispersandwishes
Melissa Schooley (Visit website@ragingbowl
Kristine Schroeder (Visit website@Wiresculptress
Mark Schutter (Visit website@MalekoArts
Julie Schwartz (Visit website)
Dorian Scotti (Visit website)
sylvia scriver
darlene seale (Visit website)
Gwenn Seemel (Visit website@gwennpaints
Bettina Sego (Visit website)
Matthew Sewell (Visit website)
brenda shackleford (Visit website)
Tiara Shafiq (Visit website@creatrixtiara
Ken Shanika (Visit website)
Nayna Shriyan (Visit website@artistnayna
Anne Shutan (Visit website)
Sofie Siegmann (Visit website)
Kari Siler
Stefanie Silverman (Visit website)
Don Sinish (Visit website)
Lucinda Sisniega Abra (Visit website)
Ryan Skidmore (Visit website)
Pam Slaton (Visit website)
Jean Smith (Visit website@JeanSmithArtist
Sandra Smith (Visit website@iloveartalot
Oliver Smith
Judith Smith (Visit website) @judithrayeart
Christine Smith (Visit website@onehappyartist
Meg Smither (Visit website)
Sherri Snyder (Visit website)
Ruth Soller (Visit website@RuthSoller
Frank Stapleton (Visit website@flinvent
Rebecca Stees (Visit website@artyowza
Karen Steffano (Visit website)
Cindy Steiler
Carol Steinberg (Visit website@CarolSteinberg
Patience Steltzer @yoginipatience
Margaret Stermer-Cox (Visit website)
Andrea Stern (Visit website@annaline_39
Kristilyn Stevenson (Visit website@zombieromance
Dawn Stewart (Visit website@svvyshopper1
Heather Stoltz (Visit website@heatherstoltz
John Stoughtenger (Visit website)
Deb Strong Napple (Visit website)
Jen Sturgill (Visit website@JensArts
Ralph E. Swenson (Visit website)
Brian Sylvester (Visit website@BSylvesterart
Nicole Tamarin (Visit website@nicoletamarin
Kelly Tankersley (Visit website)
Janice Tanton (Visit website@JanTanton
Kendra Taylor (Visit website@seventhandpeach
Mary Theibet (Visit website)
Kelly Thiel (Visit website@kellyTpottery
suzanne thomas (Visit website) @none
Holliday Thompson (Visit website@hollidayht
Robert Thompson (Visit website@TheARtofAlaska
Marsha Thornton (Visit website@PaintPhotoLady
Lisa Thorpe (Visit website)
melinda tidwell (Visit website)
Linda Tieu (Visit website@tortagialla
Carmen Torbus (Visit website@carmentorbus
Gay Tracy (Visit website)
Dawn Trautman (Visit website@UrbanNomadUSA
Melissa B Tubbs (Visit website@melissabtubbs
Lisa Tuchek (Visit website)
Li Tyler (Visit website@LiTyler1
suzanne urban (Visit website)
Petra van Berkum (Visit website@berkumpje
Janet Vanderhoof (Visit website@JanetVanderhoof
Mary Vaneecke (Visit website@vaneecke
Victoria Veedell (Visit website)
Patricia C Vener (Visit website@AgDrgn
Marleen Vente (Visit website@monxies
Luke Verhelst (Visit website@lverhelst
Frances Vettergreen (Visit website@vettergreenart
Teresa Villegas (Visit website)
Paula Visnoski (Visit website@pmvart
Rebecca Vose (Visit website) @rebeccavose
Gunilla Wachtel (Visit website@kanweienea
Erna Wade (Visit website)
David Wagenfeld (Visit website)
Cathleen Waldrop
Anna Walker (Visit website)
Daggi Wallace (Visit website)
Judy Fischer Walton (Visit website@Judypainter
Ellen Walton (Visit website@chaucee
Debby Wang (Visit website) @misswang
Ann Wardley (Visit website)
Edward Webber
Robin Weiss (Visit website@robinpweiss
Jane Welsh (Visit website)
Kim Werfel (Visit website)
Bill Werle (Visit website@werle3
Janine Whitling (Visit website)
Leah Wiedemer (Visit website@roamingartist
Jay Wiese (Visit website) @jaywiese
Bridget Wilkinson (Visit website@brid_wilkinson
Glenda Williams (Visit website)
Skaja Wills (Visit website@SkajaW
Alicia Wishart (Visit website@leash_wish
Brooke Witt (Visit website@brookewittart
Maxine Wolodko (Visit website)
Jennifer Woodburn (Visit website@JenWoodburn
Heather Woodson (Visit website)
Lori woodward (Visit website@loriwords
Shannon Workman (Visit website) @shannonworkman
Gigi Wright (Visit website)
Joyce Wycoff (Visit website@jwycoff
Yamile Yemoonyah (Visit website) @Yemoonyah
Linda Young (Visit website@lyoungart
Laura Zerebeski (Visit website)
Claudia True (Visit website)
Antonio Basso (Visit website@antoniobasso
A Bird in the Hand Art (Visit website@BirdInHandArt
TeeJay (Visit website@justteejay
kottavei (Visit website@sagebelly
Gina (Visit website)
JanettMarie (Visit website@janettmarie
Jolie (Visit website@joliekg
andrea @amorgosaigiali
Wren (Visit website)
anjali (Visit website)Victoria Gray (Visit website)
Deborah Grayson (Visit website@GraysonStudio
Joann Greenbaum (Visit website)
norma greenwood (Visit website@normadventures
Sean Griffin (Visit website@lightscapesfoto
Lina Grigaitis (Visit website)
Elizabeth Groeschen (Visit website@elizadele
Sari Grove (Visit website@GroveCanada
Beth Grove (Visit website)
Julie Gubler (Visit website) @heroprnt
Adriana Guidi (Visit website)
Erin Gursslin (Visit website@ssilverwear
Laura Habel (Visit website@heartinhawaii
Charlotte Hagan, RN
Johanus Haidner (Visit website) @JohanusHaidner
J. Haley (Visit website@jhaleyarts
terrie hall (Visit website)
Dee Hall (Visit website) @hatup
Mckenna Hallett (Visit website)
Elizabeth Halpern (Visit website)
Kariyappa Hanchinamani (Visit website)
alison hankinson
Amelia Hansen (Visit website)
kathryn hansen (Visit website)
Rosemarie Hanus (Visit website@spawnofflame
Alice Harpel (Visit website) @aliceharpel
Martha Harrell (Visit website)
Tiffany Harris (Visit website)
Teresa Harrison (Visit website) @treeartlady
Sandi Harrold (Visit website)
Jill Hartley (Visit website)
Kathleen Harvey (Visit website@doulakat
Linda Hatfield (Visit website)
Jacqui Hawk (Visit website@jacquihawkart
David Haynes (Visit website)
Judith HeartSong (Visit website@judithheartsong
Sarah Hempel Irani (Visit website@SarahHIrani
K Henderson (Visit website)
Kate Henke (Visit website@katenke
Jock and Carmen Hildebrand (Visit website)
Deborah Hill (Visit website)
Kaylee Hinrichs (Visit website@kayleehinrichs
Libby Hintz (Visit website@libbyhintzart
ken hobson (Visit website@none
Brandon Hodgkin (Visit website)
Jackie Hoeksema (Visit website)
Vanessa Hofmann V2 (Visit website) @vvanbeusekom
Sarah Hollandsworth (Visit website@yarngeekfibers
Terry Hope (Visit website)
Carol Houghton-Tenney (Visit website)
cory huff (Visit website@agoodhusband
Aimee Hughes (Visit website) @BellaCraft
Pamela Hunt Lee (Visit website@pamela hunt lee
Floyd IAm @Floyd IAm
Lazaro Iglesias (Visit website)
Beverly Ingle (Visit website) @beverlyingle
gary irish (Visit website)
Raj Iyer (Visit website@IamRajIyer
Dolores Jablonski (Visit website) @atawhim
charlene jacka (Visit website@505clayspace
JJ Jacobs (Visit website@abstractsbyjj
Sethi Jacobson (Visit website)
James Jarvis (Visit website) @JJarvisartist
Tamara Leigh Jarvis
Leah Jay (Visit website@leahjayart
dale jenssen (Visit website)
Barry Johansen (Visit website) @barryjohnsen
Marty Johnson (Visit website@bzbwoman
Lonna Johnson (Visit website)
Sarita Li Johnson (Visit website@SaritaLiJohnson
JoAnn Jordan (Visit website@JordanEM
Becky Joy (Visit website@beckyjoyartist
April Joy (Visit website)
Melanie K (Visit website@MelanieK__
Jamie Kalvestran (Visit website@JamieKalvestran
Kelly Kautz (Visit website@KellyKauz
jonathan keeton (Visit website)
Leslie Kell (Visit website)
Toni Kelly (Visit website@A_Spattering
Barbara Kemp Cowlin (Visit website)
Donalee Kennedy (Visit website) @DonaleeKennedy
Robin Kent (Visit website)
M Sanzi Kermes (Visit website@sanzistudio
Rachel Kerwin (Visit website)
Christopher King (Visit website@wingsart
Tim King (Visit website)
Carolyn King (Visit website)
Jen Kirby (Visit website) @jenkirby
Donna Kitchens (Visit website)
Duygu Kivanc (Visit website)
Colleayn Klaibourne (Visit website)
Helen Klebesadel (Visit website@HelenKlebesadel
Laurie Klein (Visit website) @ljkphoto
Lloyd Knowles (Visit website)
Alexa Kocinski @alexakocinski
Shana Kohnstamm @shanakohnstamm
Joe Kopler (Visit website)
Christi Kraft (Visit website@CKPFineArt
Ria Krishnan (Visit website@RiaKrishnanArt
charlotte kruk (Visit website)
Candy Kuehn (Visit website) @candykuehn
Marina Kulik (Visit website@aquarellista
Helena Kuttner-Giasson (Visit website)
Jane LaFazio (Visit website@JaneLaFazio
Joshua Lance (Visit website@joshualanceart
Jamie Lapeyrolerie (Visit website) @jamielynne82
Alice Larsen (Visit website@art from alice
Marc Lawrence (Visit website@MarcLawrenceArt
Larry Le Brane (Visit website)
Robert Lee (Visit website@BruthaRob
Stacy Leeman (Visit website@stacy leeman
Susan Jane Lees (Visit website)
Shelly Leit (Visit website@shellinayaart
Teresa Levite (Visit website@mrslevite
Fay Liberty (Visit website)
Terri LLoyd (Visit website@clvngodess
Linda Loder
Vince LoGreco (Visit website@CaptainV45
Jeanne Lorenz (Visit website)
Dorothy Lorenze (Visit website@Dblorenzeartist
Beth Lowell (Visit website) @blowell
jen lowery (Visit website)
Amy Lund (Visit website@aclhandweaver
Eoin Mac Lochlainn (Visit website@EMacLochlainn
Carol MacConnell (Visit website)
Kate MacGillivary (Visit website)
kim mackey (Visit website)
Robert Maddison (Visit website)
Kathleen Mahoney (Visit website) @khmahoneyart
Robert Malcom (Visit website)
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The one in which I confess I LIKE Thomas Kinkade…

Thomas Kinkade, one of the most prolific and successful artist in modern history is dead and right now I would like to stand up and confess that I like his work…

I think somehow it reminds me of the Christmas cards of my childhood featuring cosily lit victorian coaching inns generously sprinkled with silver glitter, a prancing coach and four pulling up outside bringing laughing travellers home for the holidays. The light eminating from inside the Inn beckoning you in to curl up by the fireside with a large dog and a hearty Pickwickian Christmas dinner. A glimpse of a warm friendly interior. A safely comforting feel.

No doubt millions of others got the same sense of cosy safety in an increasingly insane world. An idealised and beautiful landscape where nothing went wrong. Kinkade managed to hit the perfect emotional spot with millions of people, an estimated 1 in 20 American homes owning one of his images. If Kinkade’s work makes people feel a spot of calm or happiness where is the harm in that? He knew his audience perfectly and knew what made them feel good.

But I shouldnt need to “confess” to this should I ?. What is so terrible about liking the work of a popular artist? Why do I neel nervous about typing this?

Who says which art I should like ?

Art dictatorship and the taste police.

I also confess I have a softspot for artists who get up the nose of the art establishment… Despite his immense popularity in the eyes of his millions of fans Kinkade attracted an enormous amount of vitriol from the “taste police” in the art world.

The sheer hatred unleashed on him {and other “not-proper-artists”} by art critics is shocking to read. It reminds me of school kids bitching about and bullying the unpopular kid behind the bike sheds. Many of those same critics are now writing articles praising Kinkades understanding of art marketing and subtly reversing away from their previous nastiness in the light of his death.

Kincade appeared to be able to laugh off the criticisms but it seems sad that his brother believes his losing battle with alcohol was probably precipitated by the constant attacks by the art establishment on him and his work which he took more to heart than he showed.

Scottish artist Jack Vettriano attracts similar criticism. Here he is described in The Guardian newspaper.

“Vettriano is not even an artist. He just happens to be popular, with “ordinary people” who buy reproductions of his pseudo-1930s scenes of high-heeled women and monkey-suited men, and celebrities who fork out for the originals of these toneless, textureless, brainless slick corpses of paintings. “

I don’t personally love Vettrianos work enough to want to own it. However, I will defend to the death the right of anyone to be able to buy it without being made to feel like a brain dead idiot with the style and taste of a wombat.

Can the internet democratise art?

The art establishment has had everything it’s own way for a long long time. This has created a dictatorship where people are afraid to be seen to like the “wrong” art. Fledgling interest in collecting art can be paralyzed by the fear of making a “mistake”. Art galleries become intimidating “no-go” areas for fear of being made to look ignorant.

This increases the perception of art as being something “not for us” by many people and this can’t be a good thing for the majority of artists when more people need to be encouraged to buy art. The massive majority of potential new art buyers are outside the New York art scene and even the gallery system itself.

However, the good news is that with the increasing prevelance of art on the internet, collectors can find the kind of art that they like and the falsely dictated notions of “good” or “bad” taste in art are becoming fast outmoded.

There is a movement towards a democratisation of the art world. People can look online and find the kind of art that appeals to them rather than what they are told they CAN like by a sneering critic. They can then safely buy the art online without being judged or made to feel uncomfortable.

Viva la Revolución!

So it is time to be proud of the art you like… no matter if it is “critic approved” or not. Don’t let anyone tell you what you can and can’t like…

So… Just for the record I LOVE LOVE LOVE the work of Vladimir Tretchikoff, famous for his popular prints of exotic beauties which graced every UK front room in the 1960s and 70’s. – dismissed with scorn in his time and now viewed as modern classics.

Wayne Hemingway, in his book Just Above The Mantelpiece says of Tretchikoff  “He achieved everything that Andy Warhol stated he wanted to do but could never achieve because of his coolness.” The line between the two artists is very fine.

I also have a soft spot for Bob Ross and his fabulous “happy little clouds” and Norman Rockwell – once described as Kitsch – now viewed as classic American art.

The Last Word

The last word should go to art critic Louis Leroy describing a painting of a sunrise over water…

“A preliminary drawing for a wallpaper pattern is more highly finished than this seascape,”

The artist he was pouring scorn on was one Claude Monet

Hmmm…

 

Which artists do you like that you “aren’t supposed to” ? Stand proud and share with us in the comments.

 

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Your Artist’s Sketchbook – 10 Tips For Creativity

Most Artists use sketchbooks as a means of recording an idea, object or place. However, getting the best use out of your sketchbook is about way more than having a pretty book with a nice picture on every page. Here’s how to get low down and dirty with your sketchbook to squeeze more creativity out of it.

    1. The sketchbook is a means to an end – not the end itself.
      Try not to view your sketchbook as something you could put in a gallery all by itself. Look at it more as an old friend you can bounce ideas off in a smokey pub.

 

    1. Dont be precious about your sketchbook – It will stifle your creativity.
      Years ago as a Art Foundation Student myself and the other students were given sketchbooks to work in and proceeded to be really tense about them spending hours crafting perfect pages, getting really uptight and competitive about the work in them. Then one of the older more wizened members of staff got us all to place our sketchbooks in a big pile on a table and proceeded to pour thick black coffee all over them. Result – Lots of shouting and some tears but a great lesson learned. Just relax – You willl be far more creative.

 

    1. Don’t tear out pages or remove work you aren’t happy with. 
      Your sketchbook should be honest. Dont try to edit it. It’s there as a record of your thoughts and even terrible work is a record of your progress. Even if it looks dreadful there may be an idea there you can come back to at a later stage.

 

    1. Keep a small sketchbook with you at all times.
      As a Mum I get little time to do anything but there’s always a little moment you can snatch, when the kids have fallen asleep in the car, when you’re waiting at the school gates, when you have precisely two minutes to draw something. You also have something to hand to quickly write down a great idea that pops into your head when you are at the Supermarket checkout. Having a sketchbook at these snatched times is important to keep your creativity flowing.

 

    1. Don’t just draw.
      Write down thoughts, textures, sounds, conversations. Its these everyday snippits that are often inspirational.

 

    1. Buy a cheap sketchbook.
      If you treat yourself to a beautiful hand crafted leatherbound hand made paper filled sketchbook you will get so hung up about putting the perfect work in that you will get paralysed by lack of creative confidence [well, maybe thats just me] Just get your self a cheap general sketchbook and you will use it much more and be more relaxed.

 

    1. Be Messy.
      Try out new techniques and materials in your sketchbook. That way you have an ever growing reference library of what works [and what doesn’t].

 

    1. Collect things – Stick them in your sketchbook
      Postcards from exhibitions, feathers, leaves, photos, textiles, paint samples, flyers, stickers, magazine cuttings and other ephemera can all find a home in your sketchbook as a source of inspiration. This stops them festering in the bottom of your handbag until they are unrecognisable and you bin them.

 

    1. It may be obvious but… keep a pen or pencil with your sketchbook.
      There’s nothing more frustrating that having a great idea or seeing something amazing and having nothing to draw or write it down with. Make sure you have a drawing implement that will tuck safely into your sketchbook. Clip it on, tuck it down the spine or stick it on with sellotape if neccessary.

 

    1. USE IT
      Its so easy to get out of the habit of working in your sketchbook. You forget to take it out a few times and before you know it you haven’t worked in it for six months. I find personally that my sketchbook is the root of all my creative processes so its really important to keep using it. Once you are in the habit you get in a flow and can create a positive spiral of creativity. Just keep going.
How do you use your sketchbook? Please share with us in the comments…

 

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